Friday, October 30, 2009

Day Two Hundred Forty-two, 091028 - Tillamook, OR

Day Two Hundred Forty-two, Date Wednesday, October 28, 2009
Time in Saddle: 7:08
Distance for the Day: 66.22 miles From Astoria To Tillamook, OR
Accumulated Trip Distance: 11,918 miles
Altitudes: Starting/Ending 282’/60’, Highest: 605’ Accumulated: 2864’
Speeds: Avg: 9.2 mph, Max: 36.9 mph
Weather: 42° thin, solid overcast
Expenditures: $41

Woke up at 6:41am got up at 6:45am; shaved – I try to shave every few days; a truck did roll by – it must have gotten through the locked gate, but he didn’t mind my being here; did hear some kind of far off explosion in the wee hours, but don’t know what that was; there was a sign that said “Live fire in progress when flagged,” so I wondered if the explosion had anything to do with that, but I doubted it; saw the red glow of sunrise, but that’s now gone, and it’s just a cool, moist, gray day; 7:57am and ready to roll off this mountain I climbed; 8:44am stopped at mini mart for hot cocoa and muffin; spent $25 and continuing south along the Oregon coastline; stopped in Seaside at 11am for a few additional food and drink supplies ($4) and continued on; stopped in Cannon Beach to look for Joby tripod at Radio Shack (no luck), but did buy a new Velcro strap for my water bottle holder at the hardware store next door. I keep losing the straps for that thing – hopefully, this one will stay with me until the end. Further south, I stopped in Manzanita for more food items ($4). I came coasting down a long grade, and the windchill in combination with the lack of pedaling got me a little hypothermic. I stopped to wolf down the 2nd half of my Subway sandwich, quick (I wanted to make the next big town, Tillamook, before dark), and pounded on.

Went to a pizza parlor ($8), plugged in, and found a wi-fi signal from the nearby Radio Shack; answered email, checked weather, checked my route, and blogged; stayed from 6:15pm to 9pm closing; got to talking with the pizza place owners, they suggested an abandoned former Safeway building, I found a spot behind it up the loading dock to be high and dry, somewhat, and set up my tent up there at about 9:30-10pm (N45 27.763’ W123 50.558’); inside with twisty chips, soda, and new book, which I read until 11pm and then went to sleep; it wasn’t raining, but it was lightly drizzly; it might have lightly rained during the night but not bad.

9 comments:

John Howes said...

Thanks for the updates! With all the rain you are having to endure you must be feeling like this part of the trip is quite a slog. Hang in there, because you are getting close to the finish!

Stephen Seko said...

Don,
Since you're coming to the end of your journey, are you feeling somewhat sad or rather, are you just anxious to sleep in your own warm bed once again? I'm sure you'll summarize your feelings about the whole experience upon your return home. I'm excited to read about your highs and lows and what your ultimate "take-away" was from this adventure.

obi_donkenobi said...

Hi John: Yer welcome for the updates - I'm glad you enjoyed them. Yeah, I think it's going to be a somewhat soggy slog back to the finish line, but I remain hopeful to the end that the weather will clear and stay that way those final few days. ;~Don

Hi Stephen: Sorry for the delay - I answered your questions in your comment from the previous day - please see them, there. Thanks! ;~Don

Stephen Seko said...

Don,
Thanks for your response. I didn't mean to sound overly anxious or persistent with my question. I didn't realize I posted it twice. Sorry. How do you feel mentally? Did the experience result in any revelations (e.g. an increased confidence in your self-reliance, etc.)?

obi_donkenobi said...

Hi Stephen: Well, that's hard to say. I had already made a huge life-change, or rather, had a huge life change imposed on me (getting laid-off/retiring). I learned a few things, such as how great some of the people in this world are, irrespective of their diverse backgrounds. I also experienced the amazingly diverse ecologies of the different states I visited. I, of course, knew intellectually what these different places were like, but to have been to them and experienced them with my own senses - well, it's just not something you can even closely grasp without going there and living in it, yourself. I did become more confident in finding stealth camps. And I think I'm more confident in achieving long term goals, knowing that with time, persistence, and a bit of careful planning and preparation, and taking small steps, I can do just about anything - within reason. I mean, no matter how hard I tried, I doubt I'd be able to become an astrophysicist, an Olympic gymnast, or a brain surgeon, old as I am. But, I think I could start and run a successful business, or become an artist welding together cool whirlygigs, or whatever. ;~Don

SamSpade_dk said...

Hi Don,

I have now read your complete blog over the last couple of weeks and I am rather envious of fantastic adventure. I have for a long time thought of doing a similar thing in Europe, going to extreeme compas points of the 27 EU member states. Great stuff ! keep it up !

Jan Torleif

obi_donkenobi said...

Hi Jan: Thanks for the feedback and encouraging words. I hope you do get to tour Europe, and hit the extreme compass points. That would be great! ;~Don

SamSpade_dk said...

Hi Don,

I was wondering where you have got to along the pacific coast. Managed to attach my picture to my Google ID. FaceBook is the big thing in Denmark where I am from.

Regards -- Jan

obi_donkenobi said...

Hi Jan: I'm in the town of Arcata, where my cousin Pat and her family live. It's just about 6 miles north of Eureka. I'm about ready to upload the next batch of blogs, so you can read all about it - how nice! ;~Don